A+ A-
Saving sight. Changing lives.

News & Events

Affiliated with the University of MelbourneUniversity of Melbourne Logo

Please stop this eye disease from devastating more families

A genetic eye disease is wreaking havoc on families. Parents and their children are losing vision suddenly and severely.

Claire, Llewellyn, Meredith and Sue Prain have all been affected by LHON.

Claire, Llewellyn, Meredith and Sue Prain have all been affected by LHON.

“The hardest thing of all has been to watch my three lovely daughters develop the condition…it casts a deep shadow on our lives,” says Sue Prain.

Sue and her daughters have Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). This genetic condition causes an otherwise healthy person’s optic nerve to deteriorate, leading to abrupt loss of sight.

No one should experience the fear of sudden vision loss. Please donate today to find a treatment for LHON.

Sue lost sight when she was 14-years-old. Although still active, she can’t drive and can’t read sheet music; she can only the play songs she knows off by heart on the piano.

Her youngest, Claire, was diagnosed at age six. “Her vision’s been the least affected, but it’s still not good enough for her to get her driver’s licence,” Sue says.

Meredith was just about to sit her year 12 exams when she lost her sight “quite severely.”

Your donation can stop LHON from devastating more families by funding research into a treatment.

Sue and her family thought the worst was over, but 18 months ago LHON struck again. This time, it’s had a profound impact on her middle child, Llewellyn.

Sue states, “The damage is catastrophic. She is quite blind and unable to see any print, this is particularly cruel as she had her own business as a writer.”

Associate Professor Ian Trounce and his team are working to discover a treatment for LHON. Your donation will help them in their quest to stop LHON from devastating more families.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with LHON, please know there is support available to you. Speak to your eye doctor in the first instance.


print