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2014 Keratoconus Research Update

It’s an exciting and hopeful time for people with keratoconus and there was plenty of news to report at the Keratoconus Information Forum hosted by the Centre for Eye Research Australia (CERA) in Melbourne on Tuesday 11 November 2014.

Keratoconus is a common degenerative condition of the eye where the cornea (front window of the eye) gets progressively thinner. As a result of this thinning, the normally round shape of the cornea becomes distorted and a cone-like bulge develops. This results in significant visual impairment.

Hosted by Associate Professor Mark Daniell, Principal Investigator, Corneal Research, the evening featured presentations the from keratoconus researchers at CERA who outlined breakthroughs for treating and halting the progression of the disease.

Professor Paul Baird, Principal Investigator, Ocular Genetics, covered the topic Genes, environment and keratoconus, which focused on how the identification of keratoconus genes has led to the development of new screening methods to identify the people at risk of the disease.

Dr Srujana Sahebjada, Research Optometrist, gave an update on the keratoconus innovations happening at CERA with a focus on technological advances in treatment.

Dr Elsie Chan, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne, spoke about Cross-linking – 2014 and beyond. Corneal collagen cross-linking, a technique which uses UV light to strengthen chemical bonds in the cornea and has the potential to be the most significant breakthrough in treating and stopping keratoconus.

Information about the Australian Study of Keratoconus is available here.

The event was supported by Keratoconus Australia.

To view the slides from the event please click on the links below:

Associate Professor Mark Daniell, Dr Elsie Chan, Rob Kfoury, Dr Srujana Sahebjada, Professor Paul Baird and Larry Kornhauser

(L-to-R) Associate Professor Mark Daniell, Dr Elsie Chan, Rob Kfoury, Dr Srujana Sahebjada, Professor Paul Baird and Larry Kornhauser